5 reasons why small hills are better than big mountains by Phoebe Smith

As Phoebe Smith’s new book comes out celebrating Britain’s little pint-size peaks, she tells us why sometimes when hiking, it’s all about the little things… Read More 5 reasons why small hills are better than big mountains by Phoebe Smith

Events this autumn at the Royal Geographical Society (with IBG)

The Royal Geographical Society’s programme of events this autumn includes something for everyone, with a wide range of talks, discussions and exhibitions at venues across the UK. Read More Events this autumn at the Royal Geographical Society (with IBG)

Book Launch: The Amazing Animal Atlas

Last week we hosted the launch party for The Amazing Animal Atlas. Written by Dr Nick Crumpton, a specialist in zoology, this atlas features huge fold-out spreads brimming with biologically-accurate illustrations by Gaia Bordicchia.

 

Read More Book Launch: The Amazing Animal Atlas

Cycle to Work Day

“It is by riding a bicycle that you learn the contours of a country best, since you have to sweat up the hills and coast down them. Thus you remember them as they actually are, while in a motor car only a high hill impresses you, and you have no such accurate remembrance of country you have driven through as you gain by riding a bicycle.”- Ernest Hemingway

13th September 2017 is National Cycle to Work Day.  Not only is cycling to work good for learning the lay of the land, it is also a great way of sneaking exercise into your daily routine and it means you can legitimately eat a second breakfast. Read More Cycle to Work Day

Book Launch: Where the Wild Winds Are by Nick Hunt

Last night we hosted the book launch for Nick Hunt’s new book Where the Wild Winds Are. Mixing travel and nature writing, Nick walks the path of four of Europe’s winds across the continent. Read More Book Launch: Where the Wild Winds Are by Nick Hunt

NEW MAP: South Georgia and the Shackleton Crossing

The cartographers at British Antarctic Survey (BAS) have re-produced a high-resolution updated map of the sub-antarctic island of South Georgia. The island, situated at 37°W 54°10’S is a haven for wildlife, a centre for wildlife and fisheries research and famous for the epic voyage by Sir Ernest Shackleton and his men in May 1916. Read More NEW MAP: South Georgia and the Shackleton Crossing

Where Poppies Blow by John Lewis-Stempel wins Wainwright Prize

He’s done it again. John Lewis-Stempel has won the Wainwright Golden Beer Book Prize with his book Where Poppies Blow.  Chronicling the relationship between man and nature during the Great War, this win is particularly poignant as this week is the centenary anniversary of the battle of Passchendaele. Lewis-Stempel is no stranger to winning this award having picked up the prize in 2015 with Meadowland.

The winner was announced this afternoon at the BBC Countryfile Live at Blenheim Palace, Oxfordshire.

For the full shortlist see here.