Stanfords Bristol to take part in BA/Egmont Eager Readers Project

We are thrilled to announce that Stanfords Bristol will be one of the bookshops participating in the BA/Egmont Eager Readers project, established earlier this year as part of the Bookseller’s Association Diversity & Inclusivity initiative.

The six-week summer reading project aims to inspire reading for pleasure through allowing children to choose their own books and encouraging parents to read to their child on a daily basis. We’ll be working with a primary school in the city centre to sign up local families with a child between the ages of 7 and 11 who is reluctant to read and with parents who find it difficult to make time to read to their child.

Read More Stanfords Bristol to take part in BA/Egmont Eager Readers Project

Elsewhere with Rosita Boland

In the last thirty years, Rosita Boland has visited some of the most remote parts of the globe carrying little more than a battered rucksack and a diary. To celebrate the publication of her new book Elsewhere, here she shares with us three offbeat things from her travels.

The weirdest thing I ever saw for sale

I was standing with my rucksack in Florence, waiting for the bus that was going to take me to the hostel. The stop was by a very fancy shop opposite the Dumou, the city’s famous church. You had to ring a bell to go into the shop. I didn’t ring. I knew from looking in the window everything on sale in there was far beyond my budget. Beautiful, handmade leather notebooks. Delicate silver bowls. Hand-blown glass.

Read More Elsewhere with Rosita Boland

Q&A with Dan Richards

Ahead of his event at Stanfords Bristol this week, author Dan Richards discusses his new book Outpost – an exploration of far-flung shelters in mountains, tundra, forests, deserts and oceans – and answers few of our questions.

What books, authors or novels inspired you in writing Outpost? And what are you reading at the moment?

At the moment I’m reading Brian Dillon’s Essayism and Muriel Spark’s The Finishing School. I tend to read several books at once. Also The Pine Barrens by John McPhee; that’s on my bedside table — but Jan Morris, Joan Didion, Rebecca Solnit, and J.A. Baker have taken me on eye-popping journeys into strange lands. Richard Brautigan, Bob Dylan, George Simenon, Lavinia Greenlaw, Mark Doty, David Bowie, Cate Le Bon, T.S Eliot, Denis Johnson, Ted Hughes and Alice Oswald are a never-ending source of indelible images. I try to furnish my books with as much poetry, art, music and literature as possible and all those fed into Outpost.

Read More Q&A with Dan Richards

Our bestselling Ordnance Survey maps of 2019 so far

With the long Easter weekend ahead, we are sure a lot of you have made plans with the great outdoors. We thought it would be a good time to look over our bestselling Ordnance Survey maps of 2019 so far. Hopefully they will inspire you in your trip planning.

Read More Our bestselling Ordnance Survey maps of 2019 so far

The 2019 Edward Stanford Travel Writing Awards Shortlist

The shortlists for the 2019 Edward Stanford Travel Writing Awards have been announced and contain an eclectic mix of writing from around the globe. This year we have introduced a new award Travel Memoir of the Year. Here are the full shortlists: Read More The 2019 Edward Stanford Travel Writing Awards Shortlist

6 things you probably didn’t know about the extreme north of Greenland

In December of 2013, Alex Hibbert led an international quartet of polar travellers to the extreme north of Arctic Greenland. After a huge storm destroyed their intended route to the North Pole in the darkness of winter, instead of retreating, they decided to explore the beautiful but unforgiving region of Avanerriaq, the home of the Polar Eskimos. What followed was six months of harsh education, gripping adventure and… twenty unruly sled dogs. We asked the author of Polar Eskimo to tell us about Northern Greenland: Read More 6 things you probably didn’t know about the extreme north of Greenland

Seashaken Houses – a journey around Britain’s most remote lighthouses

Ushered upwards by labourers clinging to scaffolds or dangling in harnesses, they are feats of engineering, imagination and bravery, built at great financial and human cost. Waves frequently confiscated tools, dismantled masonry and swept workmen away. Although shaped to resist the sea, these unique buildings share something of its mystery and power, and bear witness to the history of our maritime past.

Offshore lighthouses are not like ordinary lighthouses. Over a period spanning four centuries, with Britain’s booming sea trade dogged by shipwrecks and drownings, we undertook to build in the sea itself. Beyond the apparent finality of Britain and Ireland’s coastlines these 170-foot high towers still stand today, raised perilously on underwater reefs and rising mirage-like out of the water. Although no longer inhabited, their chambers still bear signs of the people who once lived in them. But apart from discreet mapping, or the occasional glimpse from a distant ferry, the existence of these isolated sentinels remains unknown to most.

Ahead of his event at Stanfords on Tuesday 16th October, the author of Seashaken Houses: A Lighthouse History from Eddystone to Fastnet, Tom Nancollas takes us to some of the most emblematic surviving offshore lighthouses.  Read More Seashaken Houses – a journey around Britain’s most remote lighthouses