Where is Drury Lane? Getting lost in London by Jon Woolcott

I’m not a practical man: simple DIY tasks fox me, I don’t enjoy ladders, electricity makes me jumpy. I’ll call for technical help when my printer runs low on toner. I have a handyman on speed-dial, a capable wife, and a nearby younger brother for whom these tasks hold no terrors. But for all this I find that one science, or sort of science, Geography, is my friend. It’s not all Geography – specifically it’s a sense of place. My sense of direction, if not exactly unerring, is well attuned to the compass points. I know where I am, and mostly, where I’m going. I love Ordnance Survey maps, whatever their scale, not only for their solid reliable practicality, but for the way they situate me so completely in any landscape, and for their often remarked-upon beauty. I can spread a map on the floor and pore over it for hours, bum aloft, tracing footpaths and rivers, marvelling over contour lines marking hills and steep sided valleys, wondering over derivations of village names, imagining the lost settlements marked in that ghostly gothic script. In short, I know my way around, and I am glad of it.

Read More Where is Drury Lane? Getting lost in London by Jon Woolcott

Stanfords sponsors free ‘Earth Photo’ exhibition at the Royal Geographical Society (with IBG)

Image: Rosamund Macfarlane. Eagle Huntress Receiving– Altai Mountains, Mongolia

A shortlist of 50 exceptional photographs and films that document the earth in all its diversity, will be presented at the Royal Geographical Society in London from 23 July to 21 September 2018 for the inaugural Earth Photo exhibition. Read More Stanfords sponsors free ‘Earth Photo’ exhibition at the Royal Geographical Society (with IBG)

Five examples of how the map of London isn’t always as it first appears

Artist and cartographer Adam Dant surveys London’s past, present and future with his beautiful, witty and subversive cartographic pieces. His astonishing maps offer a compelling view of history, lore, language and life in the capital and beyond.

To celebrate the launch of ‘Maps of London & Beyond’ we asked Adam Dant to give us Five examples of how the map of London isn’t always as it first appears. Read More Five examples of how the map of London isn’t always as it first appears

Stanfords Staff Selects: London Fiction

Here at Stanfords we sell maps and books from all over the world, but sometimes there is no place like home. We currently have a buy one get one half price offer on a selection of our favourite London books, gifts and guides. To give you a real taste of this wonderful city, here is some of our favourite London fiction: Read More Stanfords Staff Selects: London Fiction

Five reasons to climb trees by Jack Cooke

What better way to explore the city than through its canopy of trees? Jack Cook, author of The Tree Climber’s Guide tells us why we should leave terra firma every now and then and take to the trees: Read More Five reasons to climb trees by Jack Cooke

5 Reasons why Covent Garden is important in London’s architectural development, by Chris Rogers

To coincide with the release of his new book How to Read London: A crash course in London architecture Chris Rogers has selected some local significant sights near our Long Acre store that all feature in the book. Read More 5 Reasons why Covent Garden is important in London’s architectural development, by Chris Rogers