Edward Stanford Travel Writing Awards 2016

“As the world grows smaller and in many cases more dangerous, travel writing in all its forms keeps us in touch with our global family. These disparate shortlists have one unifying feature – they are all marvellous examples of what travel writing and publishing does best, which is to show the reader a world far from our own doorsteps, made reachable by these glorious, powerful and unforgettable books.” Tony Maher, Managing Director of Edward Stanford Limited.

  • Winner of Edward Stanford Award for Outstanding Contribution to Travel Writing

    Michael Palin, the writer, actor and Monty Python star who became Britain’s favourite traveller following phenomenally successful BBC series and books such as Around the World in Eighty Days and Pole to Pole, was presented with the Edward Stanford Award for Outstanding Contribution to Travel Writing.

    Michael Palin winner of Edward Stanford Award for Outstanding Contribution to Travel Writing
  • Stanford Dolman Travel Book of the Year

    • Deep South by Paul Theroux
    • Interstate: Hitchhiking Through the State of a Nation by Julian Sayarer
    • Squirrel Pie (and other stories): Adventures in Food Across the Globe by Elisabeth Luard
    • Station To Station: Searching for Stories On The Great Western Line by James Attlee
    • The Hills of Wales by Jim Perrin
    • White Sands: Experiences from the Outside World by Geoff Dyer
  • Specsavers Fiction (with a sense of place)

    • Do Not Say We Have Nothing by Madeleine Thien
    • The High Mountains of Portugal by Yann Martel
    • The Muse by Jessie Burton
    • The Noise of Time by Julian Barnes
    • The Tobacconist by Robert Seethaler (Translated by Charlotte Collins)
    • To the Bright Edge of the World by Eowyn Ivey
  • Wanderlust Adventure Travel Book of the Year

    • Africa Solo by Mark Beaumont
    • Climbing Days by Dan Richards
    • Crossing the Congo by Mike Martin, Chloe Baker & Charlie Hatch-Barnwell
    • Cycling the Earth by Sean Conway
    • Dare to Do by Sarah Outen
    • Walking the Himalayas by Levison Wood
  • National Book Tokens Children’s Travel Book of the Year

    • Atlas of Animal Adventures by Lucy Letherland, Rachel Williams & Emily Hawkins
    • Atlas of Oddities by Clive Gifford & Tracy Worrall
    • A River by Marc Martin
    • A Walk on the Wild Side by Louis Thomas
    • A Year Full of Stories by Angela McAllister & Christopher Corr
    • Hello World by Jonathan Litton and L'Atelier Cartographik
  • Food and Travel Magazine Food & Travel Book of the Year

    • Eivissa: The Ibiza Cookbook by Anne Sijmonsbergen
    • Persepolis by Sally Butcher
    • Provence to Pondicherry by Tessa Kiros
    • Rick Stein's Long Weekends by Rick Stein
    • Summers Under the Tamarind Tree by Sumayya Usmani
    • The Saffron Tales by Yasmin Khan
  • Destinations Show Illustrated Travel Book of the Year

    • An Atlas of Countries That Don't Exist by Nick Middleton
    • Britain's Tudor Maps: County by County by John Speed
    • Explorers' Sketchbooks by Huw Lewis-Jones & Kari Herbert
    • This Land by Roly Smith & Joe Cornish
    • The Travel Book by Lonely Planet
    • The Un-Discovered Islands by Malachy Tallack & Katie Scott
  • London Book Fair Innovation in Travel Publishing

    • Atlas Obscura by Joshua Foer, Dylan Thuras & Ella Morton
    • Blue Crow Media Maps Series by Derek Lamberton
    • Citix60: City Guides
    • Curiocity by Henry Eliot & Matt Lloyd-Rose
    • Lonely Planet's Best Of Guides
    • Where the Animals Go by James Cheshire & Oliver Uberti
  • Stanford Dolman Travel Book of the Year

    • Deep South by Paul Theroux

      Acclaimed and beloved travel writer Paul Theroux turns his attention to his own country - America - for the first time in Deep South.

      For the past fifty years, Paul Theroux has travelled to the far corners of the earth - to China, India, Africa, the Pacific Islands, South America, Russia, and elsewhere - and brought them to life in his cool, exacting prose. In Deep South he turns his gaze to a region much closer to his home.

      Travelling through North and South Carolina, Georgia, Tennessee, Mississippi, Alabama and Arkansas, Paul Theroux writes of the stunning landscapes he discovers - the deserts, the mountains, the Mississippi - and above all, the lives of the people he meets.

      The South is a place of contradictions. There is the warm, open spirit of the soul food cafes, found in every town, no matter how small. There is the ruined grandeur of numberless ghostly towns, long abandoned by the industries that built them. There are the state gun shows and the close-knit,subtly forlorn tribe of people who attend and run them. Deep in the heart of his native country, Theroux discovers a land more profoundly foreign than anything he has previously experienced.

    • Interstate: Hitchhiking Through the State of a Nation by Julian Sayarer

      Recruited to work on a documentary project, Julian goes to New York convinced he has hit the big time at last.

      Finding the project cancelled, he wanders the city streets and, with nowhere else to go, decides to set out hitchhiking for San Francisco. Revisiting this timeless American journey finds an unseen nation in rough shape. Along the road are homeless people and anarchists who have dropped out of society altogether, and blue-collar Americans who seem to have lost all meaning in forgotten towns and food deserts.

      Helped along by roadside communities and encounters that somehow keep a sense of optimism alive, Interstate grapples with the fault lines in US society. It tells a tale of Steinbeck and Kerouac, set against the indifference of the vast US landscape and the frustrated energy of American culture and politics at the start of a new century.

    • Squirrel Pie (and other stories): Adventures in Food Across the Globe by Elisabeth Luard

      Elisabeth Luard, one of the food world's most entertaining and evocative writers, has travelled extensively throughout her life, meeting fascinating people, observing different cultures and uncovering extraordinary ingredients in unusual places. In this enchanting food memoir, she shares tales and dishes gathered from her global ramblings.

      With refreshing honesty and warmth, she recounts anecdotes of the many places she has visited: scouring for snails in Crete, sampling exotic spices in Ethiopia and tasting pampered oysters in Tasmania. She describes encounters with a cellarer-in-chief and a mushroom-king, and explains why stress is good news for fruit and vegetables, and how to spot a truffle lurking under an oak tree.

      Divided into four landscapes – rivers, islands, deserts and forests – Elisabeth's stories are coupled with more than fifty authentic recipes, each one a reflection of its unique place of origin, including Boston bean-pot, Hawaiian poke, Cretan bouboutie, mung-bean roti, roasted buttered coffee beans, Anzac biscuits and Sardinian lemon macaroons.

      Illustrated with Elisabeth's own sketches, Squirrel Pie will appeal to anyone with a taste for travel, and an affinity for that most universal of languages, food.

    • Station To Station: Searching for Stories On The Great Western Line by James Attlee

      The line from London to Bristol connects two great cities, but what lies in between?

      London’s western suburbs, the Thames Valley, acres of farmland punctuated by provincial towns; where is the interest in such a landscape? To his surprise, James Attlee – a regular traveller on the route – finds it rich in unexpected encounters and the line awash with ghosts, including those of Charles I, Oscar Wilde, Lawrence of Arabia, the Beautiful Spotted Boy, Haile Selassie, Stanley Spencer, Diana Dors, Eddie Cochran and the creator of the line himself, Isambard Kingdom Brunel.

      But this is not another nostalgic book about ‘heritage’ England. As Britain embarks on the greatest period of rail construction since the nineteenth century, trains are once more seen as the future, not the past. Part voyage of exploration, part history, part meditation on the nature of travel, Station to Station takes the reader on a journey into the psyche of a nation, along one of its most iconic lines.

    • The Hills of Wales by Jim Perrin

      The hills of Wales have haunted Jim Perrin for six decades. And they continue to do so still, inexhaustibly, always offering new perspectives, moods and experiences.

      This book records forays into both famed and forgotten upland taking in Cader Idris and the Carneddau, Corndon Hill and the Berwyn, Pumlumon Fawr and the little hills of Llŷn, and so many others.

      They are accounts of personal explorations, journeyings and encounters, each fragment and footstep combining to form a peripatetic literary celebration.

      "As with the companion volume on Snowdon, what I want to show is the cultural distinctiveness of these hills, as well as their aesthetic dimension and their physical presence." Jim Perrin

    • White Sands: Experiences from the Outside World by Geoff Dyer

      From one of Britain's most original writers, White Sands is a creative exploration of why we travel.

      Episodic, wide-ranging, funny and smart, the linked journeys recall the themes of Dyer's Yoga for People Who Can't Be Bothered to Do It - albeit with the wisdom of (middle) age.

      From a trip to the Lightning Field in New Mexico, to chasing Gauguin's ghost in French Polynesia, from falling for someone who may or may not be a tour guide in Beijing's Forbidden City, to tracking down the house of an intellectual hero in Los Angeles, Dyer pursues all permutations of the peak experience including the trough experience.

      In his trademark style he blends travel writing, essay, criticism and fiction with a smart and cantankerous wit that is unmatched. This is a book for armchair travellers and procrastinating philosophers everywhere.

  • Specsavers Fiction (with a sense of place)

    • Do Not Say We Have Nothing by Madeleine Thien

      In Canada in 1990, ten-year-old Marie and her mother invite a guest into their home: a young woman who has fled China in the aftermath of the Tiananmen Square protests. Her name is Ai-Ming.

      As her relationship with Marie deepens, Ai-Ming tells the story of her family in revolutionary China, from the crowded teahouses in the first days of Chairman Mao's ascent to the Shanghai Conservatory in the 1960s and the events leading to the Beijing demonstrations of 1989. It is a history of revolutionary idealism, music, and silence, in which three musicians, the shy and brilliant composer Sparrow, the violin prodigy Zhuli, and the enigmatic pianist Kai struggle during China's relentless Cultural Revolution to remain loyal to one another and to the music they have devoted their lives to. Forced to re-imagine their artistic and private selves, their fates reverberate through the years, with deep and lasting consequences for Ai-Ming - and for Marie.

      Written with exquisite intimacy, wit and moral complexity, Do Not Say We Have Nothing magnificently brings to life one of the most significant political regimes of the 20th century and its traumatic legacy, which still resonates for a new generation. It is a gripping evocation of the persuasive power of revolution and its effects on personal and national identity, and an unforgettable meditation on China today.

    • The High Mountains of Portugal by Yann Martel

      Lost in Portugal.

      Lost to grief.

      With nothing but a chimpanzee.

      A man thrown backwards by heartbreak goes in search of an artefact that could unsettle history. A woman carries her husband to a doctor in a suitcase. A Canadian senator begins a new life, in a new country, in the company of a chimp called Odo. From these stories of journeying, of loss and faith, Yann Martel makes a novel unlike any other: moving, profound and magical.

    • The Muse by Jessie Burton

      A picture hides a thousand words...

      On a hot July day in 1967, Odelle Bastien climbs the stone steps of the Skelton gallery in London, knowing that her life is about to change forever. Having struggled to find her place in the city since she arrived from Trinidad five years ago, she has been offered a job as a typist under the tutelage of the glamorous and enigmatic Marjorie Quick. But though Quick takes Odelle into her confidence, and unlocks a potential she didn't know she had, she remains a mystery – no more so than when a lost masterpiece with a secret history is delivered to the gallery.

      The truth about the painting lies in 1936 and a large house in rural Spain, where Olive Schloss, the daughter of a renowned art dealer, is harbouring ambitions of her own. Into this fragile paradise come artist and revolutionary Isaac Robles and his half-sister Teresa, who immediately insinuate themselves into the Schloss family, with explosive and devastating consequences...

      Seductive, exhilarating and suspenseful, The Muse is an unforgettable novel about aspiration and identity, love and obsession, authenticity and deception.

    • The Noise of Time by Julian Barnes

      A compact masterpiece dedicated to the Russian composer Dmitri Shostakovich: Julian Barnes’s first novel since his best-selling, Man Booker Prize–winning The Sense of an Ending.

      In 1936, Shostakovich, just thirty, fears for his livelihood and his life. Stalin, hitherto a distant figure, has taken a sudden interest in his work and denounced his latest opera. Now, certain he will be exiled to Siberia (or, more likely, executed on the spot), Shostakovich reflects on his predicament, his personal history, his parents, various women and wives, his children—and all who are still alive themselves hang in the balance of his fate. And though a stroke of luck prevents him from becoming yet another casualty of the Great Terror, for decades to come he will be held fast under the thumb of despotism: made to represent Soviet values at a cultural conference in New York City, forced into joining the Party and compelled, constantly, to weigh appeasing those in power against the integrity of his music. Barnes elegantly guides us through the trajectory of Shostakovich’s career, at the same time illuminating the tumultuous evolution of the Soviet Union. The result is both a stunning portrait of a relentlessly fascinating man and a brilliant exploration of the meaning of art and its place in society.

    • The Tobacconist by Robert Seethaler (Translated by Charlotte Collins)

      When seventeen-year-old Franz exchanges his home in the idyllic beauty of the Austrian lake district for the bustle of Vienna, his homesickness quickly dissolves amidst the thrum of the city. In his role as apprentice to the elderly tobacconist Otto Trsnyek, he will soon be supplying the great and good of Vienna with their newspapers and cigarettes. Among the regulars is a Professor Freud, whose predilection for cigars and occasional willingness to dispense romantic advice will forge a bond between him and young Franz.

      It is 1937. In a matter of months Germany will annex Austria and the storm that has been threatening to engulf the little tobacconist will descend, leaving the lives of Franz, Otto and Professor Freud irredeemably changed.

      In the tradition of novels such as Fred Uhlman's classic Reunion, Bernhard Schlink's The Reader and Rachel Seiffert's The Dark Room, The Tobacconist tells a deeply moving story of ordinary lives profoundly affected by the Third Reich.

    • To the Bright Edge of the World by Eowyn Ivey

      From the internationally bestselling author of The Snow Child comes an extraordinary story of discovery, adventure, and a husband and wife tested by the different paths their society expects them to tread.

      Lieutenant Colonel Allen Forrester receives the commission of a lifetime when he is charged to navigate Alaska's hitherto impassable Wolverine River, with only a small group of men. The Wolverine is the key to opening up Alaska and its rich natural resources to the outside world, but previous attempts have ended in tragedy.

      Forrester leaves behind his young wife, Sophie, newly pregnant with the child he had never expected to have. Adventurous in spirit, Sophie does not relish the prospect of a year in a military barracks while her husband carves a path through the wilderness. What she does not anticipate is that their year apart will demand every ounce of courage and fortitude of her that it does of her husband.

  • Wanderlust Adventure Travel Book of the Year

    • Africa Solo by Mark Beaumont

      Seven years after smashing the record for cycling round the world and inspiring a generation of like-minded adventurers, Mark Beaumont set out on another epic journey that would fulfil a dream – to cycle the length of Africa, as fast as humanly possible. But to make it from Cairo to Cape Town in one piece, a distance of more than 10,000 kilometres, unsupported, would prove the toughest solo challenge of his life.

    • Climbing Days by Dan Richards

      In Climbing Days, Dan Richards is on the trail of his great-great-aunt, Dorothy Pilley, a prominent and pioneering mountaineer of the early twentieth century. For years, Dorothy and her husband, I. A. Richards, remained mysterious to Dan, but the chance discovery of her 1935 memoir, Climbing Days, leads him on a journey. Perhaps, in the mountains, he can meet them halfway?

    • Crossing the Congo by Mike Martin, Chloe Baker & Charlie Hatch-Barnwell

      In 2013, three friends set off on a journey that they had been told was impossible: the north-south crossing of the Congo River Basin, from Kinshasa, in the Democratic Republic of Congo, to Juba, in South Sudan.

      Traversing 2,500 miles of the toughest terrain on the planet in a twenty-five year-old Land Rover, they faced repeated challenges, from kleptocracy and fire ants, to non-existent roads and intense suspicion from local people.

      Through imagination and teamwork — including building rafts and bridges, conducting makeshift surgery in the jungle and playing tribal politics — they got through.

      Crossing the Congo is an offbeat travelogue, and a stunning photo-book. It is the story of a great journey, and an intimate look into one of the world’s most fragile states, told with humour and sensitivity.

    • Cycling the Earth by Sean Conway

      Sean Conway was stuck in a life dead end of his own making when he heard about a round the world cycling race. He was immediately inspired – but it was a huge undertaking and he’d hardly been on a bike in years. Could he really cycle all the way round the world, solo and unsupported?

      Six months later, after completing a punishing training schedule and packing up everything he owned into boxes, Sean was in Greenwich Park on the start line of the adventure of a lifetime. Soon he was way ahead of schedule, averaging 180 miles per day, and on course to break the round the world cycling record. But then disaster struck, and Sean was forced to confront the possibility that he may not be able to complete the race...

      In the course of his 16,000-mile journey, Sean travelled the famous pan-American highway across the Atacama Desert, outran tornados, relied on fellow travellers to ferry water across the Australian outback, and inadvertently joined a cycle club in Mumbai. He learnt things about himself he didn’t know and rediscovered a spirit of adventure that changed everything. This is a book about an amazing and sometimes incredibly difficult journey, but it’s also a book about never giving up when there’s an opportunity to follow your dreams.

    • Dare to Do by Sarah Outen

      In November 2015, Sarah Outen completed her five-year 25,000 mile journey looping the planet by cycling across Europe, Asia, and North America, and canoeing and kayaking across the North Pacific and most of the North Atlantic. This is the story of her adventure and inner journey, and also a call to action, to redefine your own boundaries, to be courageous, and to dare to do.

    • Walking the Himalayas by Levison Wood

      Following in the footsteps of the great explorers, Walking The Himalayas is Levison Wood's enthralling account of his 1,700-mile trek across the roof of the world. Levison encountered natural disasters, extremists, nomadic goat herders and shamans in his journey of discovery along the path of the ancient trade route of the Silk Road to the forgotten kingdom of Bhutan.

  • National Book Tokens Children’s Travel Book of the Year

    • Atlas of Animal Adventures by Lucy Letherland, Rachel Williams & Emily Hawkins

      Head off on a journey of discovery with this follow-up to the bestselling Atlas of Adventures! This book collects together nature’s most unmissable events from between the two poles, including epic migrations, extraordinary behaviours, and Herculean habits. Find hundreds of things to spot and learn new facts about every animal.

    • Atlas of Oddities by Clive Gifford & Tracy Worrall

      This beautiful atlas is a celebration of the unusual events, objects and people that make our world such a fascinating place.

      Living on the planet are more than 7 billion people, all with their own interests, traditions and ways of life. And the extraordinary scenery – from the icy poles to scorching hot deserts, lush tropical rainforests, giant rocky caves and canyons, remarkable rivers, lakes and seas, also provides a home to a phenomenally wide range of different animals and plants.

      This unbelievable round-the-world adventure will take you through all of the planet’s continents and countries, and on the way you’ll get to see just how diverse the world can be. The beautifully illustrated maps feature key aspects, such as borders, capital cities and major rivers, and are perfect for engaging young readers.

      Discover facts and stats about the country or region and get up close and personal with some of Earth’s most mysterious and unusual creatures, places, objects and events in this beautiful world atlas for children and adults alike.

    • A River by Marc Martin

      “There is a river outside my window. Where will it take me?”

      And so begins an imaginary journey from the city to the sea. From factories to farmlands, freeways to forest, each new landscape is explored through stunning illustrations and poetic text from this award-winning picture book creator. The story follows an environmental theme similar to the one Marc Martin explored in A Forest.

    • A Walk on the Wild Side by Louis Thomas

      This action-packed voyage across the world’s most incredible habitats puts you face-to-face with a colourful cast of 65 animal friends, captured in fine detail by Louis Thomas. With simple, funny and informative captions you can discover why meerkats hunt in packs, how elephants communicate and what gorillas eat for lunch!

    • A Year Full of Stories by Angela McAllister & Christopher Corr

      Celebrate from New Year’s Day to Christmas Eve with this treasury of 52 best-loved stories from around the world and every continent. This rich resource collects folk tales from home, and legends and myths from distant lands, to commemorate the changing seasons, cultural events and international festivals throughout the year.

    • Hello World by Jonathan Litton and L'Atelier Cartographik

      Learn to greet people around the globe in this interactive atlas of hellos.

      With over 150 languages, flaps to reveal pronunciation and fact-files explaining how to write ‘hi’ in hieroglyphs and how to sign ‘hao’ in Native American hand talk. Hello World opens up a world of exploration and greetings at your fingertips.

  • Food and Travel Magazine Food & Travel Book of the Year

    • Eivissa: The Ibiza Cookbook by Anne Sijmonsbergen

      Ibiza is on the cusp of a food revolution. The island’s traditional farming and fishing culture has been supplemented with a wave of chefs and producers making artisan products and vibrant food.

      Now Eivissa, the first recipe book to showcase the incredible Ibicenco dishes Ibiza cuisine has to offer, reveals how to recreate the tastes of the white island in your own home.

      Divided into seasonal chapters to reflect the ingredients in Ibiza, these are gorgeous recipes reflecting the heritage of the cuisine, yet with contemporary twists. Sample a really simply Grilled Courgette Ribbons, Asparagus & Mint Tostada from Spring, for example, or a Grapefruit & Juniper-Encrusted Pork Salad. Try Steamed Mussels with Samphire or Chicken with Roasted Figs from Autumn. Or treat yourself with a Ricotta Pine Nut Cake or Spiced Chocolate Truffles.

      Full of stunning photography shot on location in Ibiza, both of the recipes and the island’s beautiful backdrop, these are recipes that are full of energy, warmth and enjoyment.

    • Persepolis by Sally Butcher

      Inspired by the food Sally serves up daily in her café, Persepolis brings you the most outstanding (and fun) ways of cooking without meat or fish. With delicious recipes like Aubergine Porridge with Burnt Butter, Sweet Potato, Pomegranate and Chicory Tagine and Veggiestani Gumbo, the appetite for new ways to brighten your broccoli, add sparkle to your spinach and titillate your tomatillos has never been greater.

    • Provence to Pondicherry by Tessa Kiros

      Tessa Kiros, renowned for her exquisite food and travel books, takes us on a fascinating journey across the globe to explore French culinary influences in far-flung destinations. Her journey begins in Provence, where Tessa first fell in love with French food, and explores the Mediterranean region’s links between the indigenous ingredients, flavours, materials and traditions.

      She then takes the path of early French explorers, travelling to the island of Guadeloupe in the Caribbean; Vietnam in South-east Asia; Pondicherry on the Bay of Bengal, India; La Réunion, a French island in the Indian Ocean; finally returning to France and landing in Normandy, where the cuisine is so different from the South of France. In each destination, Tessa delves into the history and culinary traditions of the country (or region), discovering how French cuisine has become embroiled with local ingredients and traditions.

      The result is an intriguing collection of recipes that will appeal to all those with a broad interest in food and culture.

    • Rick Stein's Long Weekends by Rick Stein

      To accompany the major BBC Two series, Rick Stein’s Long Weekends is a mouthwatering collection of over 100 recipes from ten European cities. Rick’s recipes are designed to cater for all your weekend meals. For a quick Friday night supper Icelandic breaded lamb chops will do the trick, and Huevos a la Flamenca makes a tasty Saturday brunch. Viennese Tafelspitz is perfect for Sunday lunch, and of course no weekend would be complete without Portuguese custard tarts or Berliner Doughnuts for an afternoon treat.

      Accompanied by beautiful photography of the food and locations, and complemented by his personal memories and travel tips for each city, Rick will inspire you to re-create the magic of a long weekend in your own home.

    • Summers Under the Tamarind Tree by Sumayya Usmani

      Summers Under the Tamarind Tree is a contemporary Pakistani cookbook celebrating the varied, exciting and often-overlooked cuisine of a beautiful country. In it, former lawyer-turned-food writer and cookery teacher Sumayya Usmani captures the rich and aromatic pleasure of Pakistani cooking through more than 100 recipes. She also celebrates the heritage and traditions of her home country and looks back on a happy childhood spent in the kitchen with her grandmother and mother.

      Pakistani food is influenced by some of the world’s greatest cuisines. With a rich coastline, it enjoys spiced seafood and amazing fish dishes; while its borders with Iran, Afghanistan, India and China ensure strong Arabic, Persian and varied Asian flavours. Sumayya brings these together beautifully showcasing the exotic yet achievable recipes of Pakistan.

    • The Saffron Tales by Yasmin Khan

      British-Iranian cook Yasmin Khan traversed Iran in search of the most delicious recipes, from the paddyfields of Gilan (where she grew up) to the pomegranate orchards of Isfahan and Shiraz. Here are her stories from home kitchens and fragrant recipes that are rooted in the rich tradition of Persian cooking. All fully accessible for the home cook, Yasmin’s recipes include the inimitable fesenjoon (chicken with walnuts and pomegranates), tahcheen (baked saffron and aubergine rice) and rose and almond cake. With photography from all corners of Iran and gorgeous recipe images, The Saffron Tales rejoices in the flavours and food of this unique and beautiful country.

  • Destinations Show Illustrated Travel Book of the Year

    • An Atlas of Countries That Don't Exist by Nick Middleton

      Acclaimed travel writer and Oxford geography don Nick Middleton takes us on a magical tour of countries that, lacking diplomatic recognition or UN membership, inhabit a world of shifting borders, visionary leaders and forgotten peoples.

      Most of us think we know what a country is, but in truth the concept is rather slippery. From Catalonia to the Crimea, and from Africa's last colony to the European republic that enjoyed just a solitary day of independence, the places in this book may lie on the margins of legitimacy, but all can be visited in the real world.

      Beautifully illustrated by fifty regional maps, each shadowy country is literally cut out of the page of this book. Alongside stories, facts and figures, An Atlas of Countries That Don't Exist brings to life a dreamlike world of nations that exist only in the minds of the people who live there.

    • Britain's Tudor Maps: County by County by John Speed

      A stunning new edition of the earliest atlas of the British Isles. Britain’s Tudor Maps: County by County reproduces the maps of John Speed’s 1611 collection The Theatre of Great Britaine in large, easy-to-read format for the first time. Compiled from 1596, these richly detailed maps show each county of Great Britain individually and as they existed at the time, complete with a wealth of heraldic decoration, illustrations and royal portraits. With an introduction by the bestselling author Nigel Nicholson, each map is presented alongside a fascinating commentary by Alasdair Hawkyard, elaborating on both the topographical features and the social conditions of each county at the time, enabling an examination of how the physical and social landscape has been transformed over time.

    • Explorers' Sketchbooks by Huw Lewis-Jones & Kari Herbert

      Despite dramatic advances in technology and equipment over the centuries, there is one vital piece of kit in most explorers’ pockets that hasn’t changed much at all – the journal. The sketchbooks and journals presented here allow us the opportunity to share, through their own eyes and thoughts, the on-the-spot reactions of around 70 intrepid individuals as they journeyed into frozen wastes, high mountains, barren deserts and rich rainforests.

      Some are well known, such as Captain Scott, Charles Darwin, Thor Heyerdahl and Abel Tasman; others are unfamiliar, including Adela Breton, who braved the jungles of Mexico to make an unparalleled record of Maya monuments, and Alexandrine Tinne, who died in her attempt to be the first woman to cross the Sahara.

      Here are pioneering explorers and map-makers, botanists and artists, ecologists and anthropologists, eccentrics and visionaries, men and women.

      A handful of living explorers, including Wade Davis, provide their thoughts on the art of exploration.

    • This Land by Roly Smith & Joe Cornish

      Joe Cornish is widely acknowledged as Britain’ s finest landscape photographer. In this new collection he explores fifty of the most amazing landscapes in Britain.

      Taking its cue from these Isles' extraordinarily diverse geology, This Land ranges from the ancient quartzite rocks of the Scottish Highlands to the gritstones and limestones of the English Pennines and the rolling chalk downs of Southern England. There are sections on Mountains, Islands, Forests and Coasts, and the book concludes with a fascinating look at the ways in which British people have shaped the landscape over thousands of years.

      Accompanying text by leading outdoors writer and campaigner Roly Smith explains how each type of rock creates its own distinctive landforms and vegetation, and how these have often been made the subject of local folklore and legend. There is room for some personal recollections from Joe and Roly about their own experiences in these magical places.

    • The Travel Book by Lonely Planet

      Take a journey through every country in the world. 850 images. 230 countries. One complete picture. With details of every United Nations-approved country in the world, and a few more principalities and dependencies besides, Lonely Planet’s Travel Book is the ultimate introduction to a world of travel and the essential travel reference book for every household!

      Each country is profiled by Lonely Planet’s expert authors and features details of when to visit, what to see and do, and how to learn more about the country’s culture from its film, music, food and drink. Every entry has a map and statistics about the country.

      All brand new, incredible photography illustrates each country, depicting what life is like in each nation from photographic portraits of people, beautiful landscape photographs and vibrant street photography.

    • The Un-Discovered Islands by Malachy Tallack & Katie Scott

      Gathered in the book are two dozen islands, once believed to be real. These are the products of imagination, deception and simple human error. From Atlantis to more obscure tales from around the globe; from ancient history right up to the present day, this is an atlas of legend and wonder, of places discovered and then un-discovered.

  • London Book Fair Innovation in Travel Publishing

    • Atlas Obscura by Joshua Foer, Dylan Thuras & Ella Morton

      Atlas Obscura revels in the weird, the unexpected, the overlooked, the hidden and the mysterious. Every page expands our sense of how strange and marvellous the world really is. And with its compelling descriptions, hundreds of photographs, surprising charts, it is a book to enter anywhere, and will be as appealing to the armchair traveller as the die-hard adventurer.

    • Blue Crow Media Maps Series by Derek Lamberton

      Blue Crow Media, founded by Derek Lamberton, publishes a series of folding twentieth century architecture guide maps. Each map, ranging from Brutalist and Art Deco London to avant-garde Moscow, is designed to reveal and celebrate the title’s style and era; and is printed by one of the UK’s leading sustainable family-run printers.

    • Citix60: City Guides

      CITIx60 explores the real attractions of creative capitals with expert advice from 60 stars of each city's creative scene - local artists, designers, chefs, architects, musicians, photographers and filmmakers.

      This an insiders' view of what makes a trip to his or her town memorable. With up to date recommendations on the hottest accommodations, eateries and shops that give the city a distinctive flair, a handy section on travel tips gives basic information on getting around as well as unusual tours to consider, and recurring festivals to better plan your trip. Detailed maps and QR codes provide ease of travel, and a blank pages section at the back of the book with lined, gridded pages allows for note-taking and sketching. In addition, the dust jacket for each volume unfolds to reveal an illustrated map of the city.

    • Curiocity by Henry Eliot & Matt Lloyd-Rose

      Curiocity is the most beautiful and unusual guidebook ever written about London. The authors reimagine the city in twenty-six distinct ways, one for each letter of the alphabet, considering how London might look from a child's perspective or mapping the airspace above the city. At the heart of each chapter is an original, hand-drawn map from artists including Chris Riddell and Steven Appleby, supplemented by countless London voices from Monica Ali to Philip Pullman to Shami Chakrabarti. With practical and highly-unusual itineraries, the authors explore every dimension of London, visiting nuclear bunkers, talking ATMs and Japanese Monkey Fish along the way.

    • Lonely Planet's Best Of Guides

      Since 1973, Lonely Planet has become the world's leading travel media company with guidebooks to every destination, an award-winning website, mobile and digital travel products, and a dedicated traveller community. Lonely Planet covers must-see spots but also enables curious travellers to get off beaten paths to understand more of the culture of the places in which they find themselves.

      Lonely Planet's Best of series is your guide to the most relevant, up-to-date advice on what to see and skip, and what hidden discoveries await you.

    • Where the Animals Go by James Cheshire & Oliver Uberti

      For thousands of years, tracking animals meant following footprints. Now satellites, drones, camera traps, cellphone networks, apps and accelerometers allow us to see the natural world like never before. Geographer James Cheshire and designer Oliver Uberti take you to the forefront of this animal-tracking revolution. Meet the scientists gathering wild data - from seals mapping the sea to baboons making decisions, from birds dodging tornadoes to jaguars taking selfies. Join the journeys of sharks, elephants, bumblebees, snowy owls, and a wolf looking for love. Find an armchair, cancel your plans and go where the animals go.